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Author Topic: Muscadines  (Read 142 times)
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twodog
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« on: August 13, 2018, 05 :16:45 PM »

I have tame muscadines. Three varieties. One black and two bronze or green. My black variety already getting ripe. I have picked a handful or real nice sweet ones and will have to start picking and freezing this week. We still have lots of muscadine jelly on hand and do not need any more right now. All my muscadines will be going to my buddy at Harrison. He and his wife are really in the homemade wine mode.
I have seen some wild muscadines already ripe too. The birds are working them over.
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Losthunter
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« Reply #1 on: August 13, 2018, 07 :39:54 PM »

never tasted them always wanted to but not sure what they are ,
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Do not spoil what you have by desiring what you have not; but remember that what you now have was once among the things you only hoped for.

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twodog
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« Reply #2 on: August 14, 2018, 04 :22:10 AM »

North Arkansas is the northern edge of the natural range for wild muscadines. They grow good as far north as Pelsor Ben Hur area but how much farther I am not sure. My Harrison buddy has none on his place. He is growing tame ones for wine and the local conservation agent was amazed at how well his are growing.
Muscadines are real good to just eat. They have big seeds that you have to work out and a thick hull. They have a tart sweetness. Deer and bears love them and many other critters besides people. They are grape size or a little bigger black with small gold or yellow specks on the hull. The vines climb and often they are way off the ground and you have to shake the wild ones down. In good years they are worth the effort to find.
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Sam Hutto
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« Reply #3 on: August 14, 2018, 07 :59:31 AM »

Love muscadines, we have lots of them around here at home and on the deer lease at Nimrod. Several folks around here grow tame muscadines and while they are good, I prefer the taste of the wild ones. They're a little stronger in flavor and not quite as sweet. All of them make great jelly and I've heard , but of course a good Baptist like me  rolleyes wouldn't know first hand, they make good wine.

I used to do deer camp west of Scotland and up on Gulf Mountain for years. We've got lots of them here and at Nimrod, but it seemed like there were more muscadines up around Scotland than here or at Nimrod.   

Speaking of where stuff grows, something that has amazed me since getting the lease at Lake Nimrod is there is no honey suckle and very few persimmons down there. Around here and at Scotland honeysuckle and persimmons are a major nuisance. Both will take over any piece of land left fallow or even while you're faming it if you don't stay on top of them. Both are also main deer foods. Persimmons when ripe and honeysuckle is probably the main year round deer browse we have. Watching the sides of the road, honeysuckle seem to stop about halfway between Perryville and Nimrod Lake. Never have figured out why, it's thick on the fences and field edges, then it just stops.   Down at camp on the south bank of Nimrod, there just isn't any honeysuckle and persimmons are rare.   
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Sam Hutto
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twodog
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« Reply #4 on: August 14, 2018, 08 :33:20 AM »

After growing the tame varieties the last 5 years. For jelly we prefer the wild ones. The tame ones are well sort of bland. They do make great wine. Not being a wine drinker I can't say but my buddy and his wife swear that the green ones I give them make the best wine they have ever made. They have doing this for years and even won some competition with their wines. I guess I will take their word for it. For eating off the vine the tame ones are great and really sweet. I have one variety that is a reddish green color that is like candy.
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twodog
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« Reply #5 on: September 12, 2018, 06 :48:45 PM »

A short update on the tame muscadines. So far there has been 19 gallons picked off 4 vines that are bearing. A couple friends came down Monday to pick and we got two 5 gallon buckets full in about and hour. They are making wine with them. I estimate another 10 gallons left to pick. I will pick again in a couple more days.
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Losthunter
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« Reply #6 on: September 12, 2018, 07 :13:16 PM »

wish I had a good source for root stock
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Do not spoil what you have by desiring what you have not; but remember that what you now have was once among the things you only hoped for.

“Life is tough, but it’s tougher if you’re stupid… There are some things a man just can’t run away from. A man’s got to have a code, a creed to live by.”
twodog
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« Reply #7 on: September 13, 2018, 02 :03:24 PM »

My varieties are not patented so I can propagate them and I do every year. It is easy to do. I think most of mine are spoke for this year but when the time to start them comes and I have any left and I remember I will PM you and see if I can help out.
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Losthunter
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« Reply #8 on: September 13, 2018, 02 :52:14 PM »

My varieties are not patented so I can propagate them and I do every year. It is easy to do. I think most of mine are spoke for this year but when the time to start them comes and I have any left and I remember I will PM you and see if I can help out.
that would be great ,, would like to know more about the process
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Do not spoil what you have by desiring what you have not; but remember that what you now have was once among the things you only hoped for.

“Life is tough, but it’s tougher if you’re stupid… There are some things a man just can’t run away from. A man’s got to have a code, a creed to live by.”
twodog
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« Reply #9 on: September 13, 2018, 03 :55:41 PM »

Muscadines are easy. I take a small plastic potting container with holes in the bottom so water does not collect and lay a vine runners in the container filled with potting soil. Put a rock on the runner to hold it against the potting soil firmly. In a short time they start rooting. I leave mine until pruning time, late February or early March, then I clip them off the runner and transplant. The varieties I have are supposed to pollinate each other and it must work with all the berries I get.
In the wild 80% of vines are males and non fruit bearing so if you try this with wild vines make sure they are bearing vines.

Look at the Ison's website. They claim to be the muscadine experts and their site is filled with all sorts of muscadine info.
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Losthunter
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« Reply #10 on: September 13, 2018, 04 :20:19 PM »

Muscadines are easy. I take a small plastic potting container with holes in the bottom so water does not collect and lay a vine runners in the container filled with potting soil. Put a rock on the runner to hold it against the potting soil firmly. In a short time they start rooting. I leave mine until pruning time, late February or early March, then I clip them off the runner and transplant. The varieties I have are supposed to pollinate each other and it must work with all the berries I get.
In the wild 80% of vines are males and non fruit bearing so if you try this with wild vines make sure they are bearing vines.

Look at the Ison's website. They claim to be the muscadine experts and their site is filled with all sorts of muscadine info.
tks will do
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Do not spoil what you have by desiring what you have not; but remember that what you now have was once among the things you only hoped for.

“Life is tough, but it’s tougher if you’re stupid… There are some things a man just can’t run away from. A man’s got to have a code, a creed to live by.”
dspeakes
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« Reply #11 on: September 17, 2018, 03 :09:13 PM »

I love some muscadine jelly but the critters always beat me to them at our house.
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twodog
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« Reply #12 on: September 17, 2018, 03 :15:32 PM »

I do preemptive coon and possum eradication. So far the deer stay mostly away and the bears have not bothered me knock on wood.
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twodog
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« Reply #13 on: September 17, 2018, 03 :17:01 PM »

As of this morning there have been 25 gallons picked off the four producing vines I have. There are several more gallons waiting to get fully ripe.
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Losthunter
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« Reply #14 on: September 17, 2018, 03 :57:11 PM »

As of this morning there have been 25 gallons picked off the four producing vines I have. There are several more gallons waiting to get fully ripe.
that should make a lot of wine
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Do not spoil what you have by desiring what you have not; but remember that what you now have was once among the things you only hoped for.

“Life is tough, but it’s tougher if you’re stupid… There are some things a man just can’t run away from. A man’s got to have a code, a creed to live by.”
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